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king_lunchb0x

Preservatives Used In Shisha?

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question here:
What preservatives do shisha companies use to keep for long shelf life.. my home made batch went bad in about 2 days. I know that nicotine is a preservative but what else do they use?

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depends on the company...

i think Tangiers uses glycerin, nicotine and molasses.

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huh i thought companies had to use some extra chemical additives to preserve the shisha.. not just glycerin and honey/molasses.maybe since i washed almost all the nicotine away.

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it would seem possible that other companies would use chemical/artificial preservatives, but that would just be speculation on my part.

Unless there's artificial preservatives in the flavorings used in Tangiers, i'm almost positive it's just nicotine, glycerin and molasses. More molasses (or glycerin or both) get added to Lucid to compensate for the lack of nicotine.

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[quote name='Arcane' timestamp='1298104409' post='498423']
it would seem possible that other companies would use chemical/artificial preservatives, but that would just be speculation on my part.

Unless there's artificial preservatives in the flavorings used in Tangiers, i'm almost positive it's just nicotine, glycerin and molasses. More molasses (or glycerin or both) get added to Lucid to compensate for the lack of nicotine.
[/quote]

ah makes sense...but i always thought Eric added gypsy tears to his shisha to make it magical that's why it cant be replicated ;)

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[quote name='Hassouni' timestamp='1298138637' post='498467']
No, oil goes rancid
[/quote]

I'd disagree, but only in part. Oil has been used as a preserving liquid for quite a while. However, it's main purpose is to minimize or completely block the air from making contact with the item being preserved. An addition of an acidic liquid prevents the ability of bacteria from forming in the oil. You'll see it a lot with garlic, tomatoes, or more commonly olives.

So, yes. Oil can be a preservative, just not a good one. Edited by Arcane

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